The 2006 Origins of Today’s Unprecedented National Lockdown

You’re locked down because of a 14-year-old girl’s high school science project.

Bush-era politicians adopted scheme of computer-simulation modelers.

That’s a question many are asking some two months into the unprecedented mass quarantine of the healthy in response to the novel coronavirus pandemic.

Whatever the answer, wrote Jeffrey A. Tucker, editorial director for the American Institute for Economic Research, it must be “a bizarre tale.”

“How,” he asked, “did a temporary plan to preserve hospital capacity turn into two-to-three months of near-universal house arrest that ended up causing worker furloughs at 256 hospitals, a stoppage of international travel, a 40% job loss among people earning less than $40K per year, devastation of every economic sector, mass confusion and demoralization, a complete ignoring of all fundamental rights and liberties, not to mention the mass confiscation of private property with forced closures of millions of businesses?”

Tucker, citing in part a New York Times story published last month, traced the theory behind the lockdown to 2006. And, indeed, it is a bizarre tale.

“So far as anyone can tell, the intellectual machinery that made this mess was invented 14 years ago, and not by epidemiologists but by computer-simulation modelers,” he wrote. “It was adopted not by experienced doctors – they warned ferociously against it – but by politicians.”

The phrase social distancing turned up for the first time in a Feb. 12, 2006, New York Times story at the time of the avian flu outbreak. Tucker recalled that the extreme warnings of its lethality didn’t pan out. Read the rest HERE.

About Alan Berkelhammer

Opinions are my own and are not necessarily those of any organization or group.
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