Fear-Based Self-Censorship Has Nearly Two-Thirds of Americans Afraid to Share Their Beliefs

by Kevin Burke

Author and First Things Editor R.R. Reno stepped away from his office and did some old fashioned reporting.  He visited several Midwestern states that were key in the 2016 election.  He wanted to get a better feel of the country’s mood away from the East Coast and mainstream media.

One of the men he interviewed shared: “Right now journalists seem ignorant of what most people are thinking, perhaps willfully so … In all fairness, most people won’t say what they’re thinking. It’s too dangerous.”

iStock / Getty Images Plus

A new Cato Institute Survey confirms this fear. “Nearly two-thirds—62%—of Americans say the political climate these days prevents them from saying things they believe because others might find them offensive,” the study found. “Majorities of Democrats (52%), independents (59%) and Republicans (77%) all agree they have political opinions they are afraid to share.” Read the rest HERE.

About Alan Berkelhammer

Opinions are my own and are not necessarily those of any organization or group.
This entry was posted in 1st Amendment, 2016 Elections, 2018 Elections, 2020 Elections, Constitution, Executive Branch, Major News Items, Media, National, Unalienable Rights and tagged . Bookmark the permalink.

1 Response to Fear-Based Self-Censorship Has Nearly Two-Thirds of Americans Afraid to Share Their Beliefs

  1. The Flash says:

    I’ve been rebelling against political correctness since the first election of Bill Clinton, 28 years ago. Why did it have to take the election of Trump for conservatives to suddenly get “woke?” We conservatives have turned a blind eye to this nonsense for so long, it’s now ingrained in our national narrative and lexicon. We’ve allowed several generations to be indoctrinated with this crap and now suddenly we cry “foul!” If Biden gets elected, there will never be any going back to sanity.

Leave a Reply